Out and About

Now that the country stutters forward in its return to normality, I have resumed my fortnightly trips back to Berkshire to visit my father. Whilst there I always try to go birding with a friend to the Spade Oak nature reserve near Marlow – a flooded gravel pit, next to a sewage works but always with something of interest.

Great Crested Grebe on nest
Two of the three well-used Tern rafts
The sign of Woodpecker predation on a wooden nest box
There were lots of Mallard families in and around the lake
Male Banded Demoiselle

This time our visit was a little bit more interesting than we had hoped for when we spotted a Greylag Goose entangled in fishing line under a low hanging Willow, but too far out in the water for us to reach.

It is just possible to see the line stretching out to the goose

We phoned Tiggywinkles Wildlife Hospital and, within the hour, a volunteer had arrived to assess the extent of the problem:

Within three hours, permissions had been sought and received and a rescue team arrived and launched a boat onto the lake although by then we had left. It was all a success and the bird was taken back to the hospital for treatment.

How absolutely wonderful it is that there are organisations to call on like that for wildlife emergencies – they are one of my favourite charitable causes.

Back again in East Kent, the Swifts continue to bombard the nest boxes but, so far as we can tell, they are not going in:

I have managed to establish that there are three Fox cubs in the meadows this year. The one-eyed vixen has twins:

The One-eyed vixen with her blue left eye and her two cubs

And the other vixen has a single cub:

The camera up by this second vixen’s den has been catching her bringing in prey. Often it’s not possible to see what the prey is but there was no mistaking this Rabbit:

Look at the Old Gentleman now. He is just starting to be able to put some weight on his bad front paw but all the fur has gone from his tail. I have treated him for mange twice this spring and am hoping that this fur loss relates to before these treatments. If I see the fur loss area spreading, I will have to contact the Fox Project charity again and see what they suggest. He’s such a worry.

There are two just-fledged Magpies being very demanding in the meadows:

One of these birds has a fledgling bird here

The ringed female Blackbird is still building her nest, of course. It has been weeks now. The nest must be very close to this gate because I have so many photos like this:

And the pair have been mating, so are laying eggs:

Other photos from the meadows this week:

It’s a good year for the Broomrape – a plant needing no chlorophyll because it is parasitic on Clover
The Holm Oaks are in full flower
I am not yet sure what this pretty vetch-like plant is, but the bees love it
A mixed gang of adult and juvenile Starlings working the meadows at the moment
Unusual to see a Wren so out in the open like this
Woodpigeon are still at the nest-building stage too
This is quite a surprising photo. These are both adult birds and my guess is that one is being fed crop milk by the other because it has been sitting for hours on the nest incubating eggs
I include this photo because it highlights the difference between the Stock Dove’s eye in the foreground and the Woodpigeon behind.
A lovely pair of Collared Dove
A new feeder with sunflower hearts has gone up in the ant paddock. We put a camera on it to see what birds were using it…
Badger going about its business
Monster from the deep

Over in the wood, I went to collect the camera that is trained on the Green Woodpecker hole and could hear the young softly churring within. They have hatched! We hope to go and digiscope the nest in the next few days to see if we can get get some better quality images now that the adults will be going backwards and forwards with food for their chicks.

Meanwhile, Great Spotted Woodpecker chicks have already fledged. One of the young has a Cormorant-like technique to dry off after visiting the bath. It was pictured doing this several times so perhaps the water is too deep for it and it is getting over-wet.

The courtship display of the male Pheasant involves spreading out his tail and pulling down his wing towards the female:

Male and female (behind) Bullfinch amidst the flowering Bugle
Cherry Ermine Moth caterpillars on Spindle
Very excited to find this vigorous White Helleborine growing in the new section of the wood
A Teasel with its water-collecting buckets at the leaf bases

We visited our local chalk cliffs again this week. Our suspicions that Peregrine Falcons are nesting there this year were confirmed when we saw one coming back with prey, its calls echoing around the cliffs:

Its arrival back at the nest was greeted with the excited noises of its chicks so the eggs have hatched.

Another adult was sitting close by:

The cliff-nesting House Martins were also busy taking food to their young:

We think this is a recently fledged Rock Pipit – it had all the feel of being parked somewhere by its parent:

I had my camera on the correct settings for flying Peregrines so was perfectly prepared when these Spitfires came over unexpectedly. Both have been adapted to take a passenger for a flight of a lifetime along the white cliffs

No Mow May has now finished when the country was being encouraged to leave its lawns uncut for the benefit of pollinators and other invertebrates. I have to say that I like the look of a wilder, more flowery, lawn especially if it is set off by a neatly cut edge or path.

Some friends have gone a stage further by removing an area of their turf from their lawn last autumn and sowing a mixture of annual and perennial meadow flower seeds.

It looks spectacular and is busy with visiting bees.

We are about to have a marquee up on our own lawn for our daughter’s wedding next weekend, postponed from last September and now with only a fifth of the number of guests. I will have to wrench my attention from wildlife matters for a while and focus on the matter in hand…

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