Here At Long Last

Our local Swifts arrived back on Bank Holiday Monday, 31st May, just as I had given up all hope. Since then they have been frequently and vigorously dive-bombing the boxes much to the concern of the nesting House Sparrows within. All four Swift boxes are currently occupied by House Sparrows but I read that Swifts will eject the Sparrows if they decide that they want to nest there so we will just have to see what happens.

It is so completely joyous to hear their screams, look up, and see a squadron of them shooting through the meadows and around the house. They also spread out and feed high in the skies above. These birds have had a battle with the weather to get here this spring, so let’s hope from now on things improve for them.

Another special experience is to sit by the pond at dusk at the end of a warm calm day, surrounded by the gentle sounds of the meadows winding down for the night, while at the same time something truly astonishing is happening in front of your eyes.

The late spring bank holiday is around the time each year that the largest dragonflies in Britain, the Emperors, emerge from the depths of the pond and undergo a remarkable transformation. It all begins when a larva climbs out of the water and clings on to a reed:

The larva is large – about 8 cm in length
Before too long, the adult dragonfly starts to push its way out through the thorax
It can all look a bit alarming
The emerging adult starts to bend over backwards as it comes out
At this point, the action stops for a while as the dragonfly gathers its strength to reach forward and flip itself over
Once it is the right way up, the wings are still compressed and fluid needs to be pumped into the wings to open them up
Even though the wings are now full size, it is several hours yet before they are hard enough to use for flight. The emergences start in the early evening so that it is dark when the dragonfly is vulnerable like this, but it is ready to fly away by dawn.

Emperors are known as colonisers of recently dug ponds and, when the ponds here were new, we had over a hundred of these Emperor emergences at the end of May every year. Now we only get a handful, but they continue to be a highlight of the wildlife year for us.

Happily photographing dragonflies
A just-emerged Broad-bodied Chaser with its discarded larval case below

Broad-bodied Chasers generally emerge before the Emperors and so are already now busy mating and egg laying.

Female Broad-bodied Chaser laying eggs into the water
The male resting up at the side of the pond awaiting the arrival of a female

After all the dragonfly admiration I had been doing, I was a bit shocked to see one in a Blackbird’s beak:

Surely this bird wasn’t going to try to get that dragonfly down the throat of a chick? This time last year, it had been hot and sunny for weeks and the ground was baked hard. There was much concern about how birds such as Blackbirds were managing to get worms out of the ground to feed to their young. Now it couldn’t be more different and every day I am seeing a selection of glorious photos on the cameras such as the one below. This is one thing I don’t have to worry about this year – baby Blackbirds are getting enough food.

I have lost count of how many weeks I have been posting photos of this ringed female Blackbird collecting nesting material. What on earth is going on? Is she building several nests?

A possible reason might be that her nests keep getting predated, perhaps? If so, here is one of the top suspects:

I think this might be a Woodpigeon egg, but Magpies will be on the look out for all sorts of nests

A lot of bird seed gets put down here and we definitely do see Rats:

A young Rat

But rodent populations here always seem to stay in a healthy balance and perhaps we have the foxes to thank for that:

This is the mother of the single cub. I always worry when I see rats being eaten in case they have been previously poisoned but if the rat was caught here it will be alright. This vixen has been treated for mange and I think I can now see fur growing back on that tail.
Her lovely cub, wet in the rain
The cub stretched out and enjoying the warmth of the sun

Towards the end of the week, we have seen two cubs together. The One-eyed Vixen also had cubs this year and I wonder of this is our first sighting of her young:

The Old Gentleman fox, still with his bad leg, and a Magpie

Only one Magpie chick has appeared in the meadows so far this year:

Chick requesting food

The female Sparrowhawk came down to the pond to bathe and this Magpie probably got a bit of a shock. No bird would ever want the gaze of a Sparrowhawk on it like this:

Other interesting photos from the meadows this week:

A male Sparrowhawk with a white eyebrow
A rare sighting of a Hedgehog
A Sawfly larva climbing a reed in the middle of the pond
There has been heavy dew some mornings this week
We have noticed that a lot of the buttercups have little snails in the flower although we don’t know why
A Crow with a beakful
A Woodpigeon, pink with the sunrise

One day this week we organised a dog sitter and took ourselves out. Our first stop was Orlestone Forest in Kent where we hoped to see the Grizzled Skipper butterfly. Unfortunately we didn’t spot one but we saw plenty of these Speckled Yellows – a day-flying moth that we had never seen before:

We also saw this Green Tiger Beetle, another new species for us:

For our second destination, we crossed over the county border and visited Rye Harbour, a Sussex Wildlife Trust nature reserve. We were hoping to see Little Terns nesting on the beach but once again we failed. We saw plenty of Avocets though:

Avocet with shrimp
Little Grebe

We were very charmed to see a Ringed Plover trying to impress a female with his courtship moves:

A good opportunity for me to revise the difference between Ringed and Little Ringed Plover. These are Ringed Plover with their orange beaks with the black tip (Little Ringed beak is all black) and no orange eye ring.

A Turnstone was very unimpressed with all this disturbance and gave the courting Plovers a piece of its mind:

One of our daughters has recently moved to East Kent and now is volunteering for Kent Wildlife Trust as a guardian of the River Stour. This weekend a group of the volunteers went out in Canadian canoes to collect litter from the river.

This is half of what their canoe collected

Beavers now live in the River Stour and I finish today with our daughter’s wonderful photo of a Beaver lodge that they paddled past whilst collecting litter. Who would have thought we had wild Beavers in East Kent.

One thought on “Here At Long Last

  1. You always get such amazing shots. Love the crow with its beakful of snails and the Turnstone giving the lovey dovey couple a piece of its mind. Those naughty magpies always seem like villains. X

    Like

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